June 16, 2017
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Is Speech Recognition Technology Taking Over?

[feature-image alt=‘’ layout=‘’ size=‘’] Is Speech Recognition Technology Taking Over? Anyone involved in Medical Transcription / Healthcare Documentation today has heard (literally) about the emergence of […]
May 24, 2017
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CanScribe Announces a New Partnership with iMedX Australia

[feature-image alt=‘’ layout=‘’ size=‘’] We are excited to announce a new partnership with iMedX Australia! Here at CanScribe, we strive to set the industry benchmark for […]
March 31, 2015
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Advanced Speedtype – Using Macros to Run Music Files

Get your music playing with just a few keystrokes! In today's production-based environment of Medical Transcription, efficiency is a must. We prepare our students for the working world by arming them with the necessary knowledge and tools to be the best MT they can be. We offer countless discussions and demonstrations to show them how to use those tools to have a successful career. However, some of the technology can seem intimidating and not all students use it as much as they should. One of the most helpful tools, and the least understood, is the word expander...

February 17, 2015
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Straight Talk on Speech Recognition Technology

Let's get to the truth about Voice Recognition Software Anyone who is involved in medical transcription today has heard (literally) all about speech recognition and where it is supposedly taking the MT industry. Voice recognition has been around for several decades but it has only been in the last decade that we have begun to fear it for its job-replacing capabilities. But is that really the way medical records documentation will go? Will we all be replaced by voice-to-text applications that can easily crank out hundreds of reports an hour? This seasoned healthcare documentation specialist says...

February 11, 2015
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4 Ways to Increase Productivity (and Make More Money)

Every medical transcriptionist from time to time wonders how to increase their work production and pay check. Your MTSO (employer) may give you a minimum line count to meet, and fulfilling that requirement sooner may free up your schedule for the rest of the day. Here are a few tips that our MT instructors have found helpful over the years to increase their productivity and accuracy - whether you worked as an independent contractor or employee for a hospital or clinic. 1. Save your keystrokes Invest in a good word expander. Word expanders are programs that allow you...

December 15, 2014
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How Can I Hear The Dictations Better?

Meet Candy Klaudeman. She is a medical transcriptionist, blogger and CanScribe graduate. She loves working from her home in Regina, Saskatchewan. She is married and is the mother of 3 children and has numerous pests--oops is that a typo--cats, birds, a gecko, crickets and fish. Candy has a passion for learning, exploring, and spirituality and loves to pass on what she has learned to help others. She gives such an honest and real student perspective in her MT articles, and we wanted to share her thoughts with you!...

October 27, 2014
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Tips For Dealing With Medical Sound-Alikes

Medical words that sound similar (and how to deal with them) Sound-alike words can pose a challenge to transcriptionists. For example, there is a vast difference between ileum and ilium, even though they sound the same. It could be a critical mistake to type the wrong word into a medical report. The ileum refers to the distal portion of the colon while ilium refers to the superior portion of the hip bone. Using the wrong word could make the medical report very confusing and could potentially put a patient's life at risk.

September 29, 2014
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Develop Your Listening Ear with Mad Gab

Mad Gab for Transcriptionists As you may know all too well, one of the hardest things about transcription is developing the listening ear. Developing a listening ear means being able to untangle complicated dictated phrases. For Medical Transcriptionists, this means developing a listening ear for the language of medicine. Almost all of the words that you are trying to untangle are brand new to you...

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Robert was born in Midland, Ontario on January 11, 1953 and passed away in Nanaimo on November 20, 2009. Robert was the youngest of three. I was the oldest, Doug was the middle child. Our mother and father were divorced when we were very young. Our mother remarried a man who had three sons and then another girl and another boy was born. So there was eight of us altogether. Robert moved to Toronto, Ontario after high school and worked in various jobs there. He then moved to Edmonton, Alberta in 1976 and on to British Columbia in 1977. He lived in Vancouver, Victoria, and finally resided in Nanaimo. Robert had a great sense of determination and optimism. The more he could learn, the happier he was. He continued his education in B.C. at Simon Fraser University. He also took courses in the culinary field and worked as a chef for many years. He also studied law and worked as a paralegal. He studied religions and languages (he could speak many languages) and took many computer courses. He took a Medical Terminology Course, and Emergency First Aid which included CPR.

Unfortunately, Robert's health was never great. He was born a "Blue Baby" and not expected to live. He lived with the HIV virus and with cancer. This was a big factor in his determination to be able to work at home and was why he was taking the Medical Transcription course. Robert was involved with various charitable organizations for many, many years. He cooked numerous meals at food kitchens for the homeless, especially at Christmas and other holidays. He spent time at various senior centers, volunteering, and visiting the residents there. He was an active volunteer at the Nanaimo Parole Citizen Advisory Committee and one of the outstanding jobs he completed for them was their Committee By-laws.

I am very proud of the things that my brother achieved in his lifetime. I have received so many letters, calls and cards since his passing, all of them telling me how much he was liked and how much he will be missed. Robert spent most of his time helping others. I'm attaching a couple of pictures, one when he was very young. If there is any other information you need, please let me know. Thank you again for setting up this scholarship. It means so much to me that his name will carry on. And I know he would be extremely pleased that his name was helping others. That was his number one goal in his life - to help others.


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